The Effects

What effects did this cataclysm, whatever its actual cause, have on humanity? How did humanity change in the years, decades and generations that followed? Physically, a slow period of rebuilding would have followed; people would have gathered together for mutual support, so that there would be enough to eat and other basic needs would be met. But for our purposes we are more interested in the psychological, emotional and spiritual trauma that must have been generated. As with any physical disaster, human reactions are essentially the same, whether the disaster is global or local, ancient or modern.  Along with the terror of the physical carnage comes shock, disbelief, rage, absolute fear for one’s own life—all the reactions we ourselves would have after a devastating fire, tornado, hurricane or earthquake.

But in this particular cataclysm, something much more intimate and personal was lost: the constant, direct experience of being consciously connected to the spiritual realm—something we can’t lose today because we don’t have it to begin with. We can only try to imagine the magnitude of this loss, and call it a greater disaster than losing one’s home by deluge, blaze, the upheaval of the Earth or mad, ripping winds. It must have felt like an internal ripping away of a similar magnitude, a colossal disorientation. It would have felt like the loss of one’s identity, the settling in of a great amnesia. A profound loss of place would have been experienced, as much on the inner levels as on the outer level. We can get an idea of the magnitude of this loss by imagining a child being abandoned by his parents, more accurately, all children being abandoned by the adults in their lives. There was no one—or very, very few—they could turn to; they were bereft of what was the most precious thing in their lives. Many survivors of the physical destruction may have perished from this inner abandonment a short time later.

The Contraction of Reality

What effects did this cataclysm, whatever its actual cause, have on humanity? How did humanity change in the years, decades and generations that followed? Physically, a slow period of rebuilding would have followed; people would have gathered together for mutual support, so that there would be enough to eat and other basic needs would be met. But for our purposes we are more interested in the psychological, emotional and spiritual trauma that must have been generated. As with any physical disaster, human reactions are essentially the same, whether the disaster is global or local, ancient or modern.  Along with the terror of the physical carnage comes shock, disbelief, rage, absolute fear for one’s own life—all the reactions we ourselves would have after a devastating fire, tornado, hurricane or earthquake.

But in this particular cataclysm, something much more intimate and personal was lost: the constant, direct experience of being consciously connected to the spiritual realm—something we can’t lose today because we don’t have it to begin with. We can only try to imagine the magnitude of this loss, and call it a greater disaster than losing one’s home by deluge, blaze, the upheaval of the Earth or mad, ripping winds. It must have felt like an internal ripping away of a similar magnitude, a colossal disorientation. It would have felt like the loss of one’s identity, the settling in of a great amnesia. A profound loss of place would have been experienced, just as much on the inner levels as on the outer level. We can get an idea of the magnitude of this loss by imagining a child being abandoned by his parents, more accurately, all children being abandoned by the adults in their lives. There was no one—or very, very few—they could turn to; they were bereft of what was the most precious thing in their lives. Many survivors of the physical destruction may have perished from this inner abandonment a short time later.